Book One, Plant One.

When you book with Iceland Advice, we offset the carbon footprint of your tour by planting a treeat no extra cost to you. Together, let’s make a dent in the climate crisis!

Book One, Plant One.

When you book with Iceland Advice, we offset the carbon footprint of your tour by planting a tree at no extra cost to you. Together, let’s make a dent in the climate crisis!

We're all Responsible

Iceland is magical. Where else on earth can you enter blue ice caves, hike on glaciers, soak in natural hot springs, explore otherworldly lava fields, and dive between tectonic plates?  

We love helping people experience our incredible country. And we firmly believe that you should be able to see the world without damaging it. We’re committed to making Icelandic tourism as sustainable as possible, so visitors can enjoy the stunning diversity in landscapes for many years to come. To do that, we need to work together!   

The Defining Issue of Our Time

The U.N. calls climate change “the defining issue of our time.” Atmospheric greenhouse gases are at their highest level in history, largely due to the burning of fossil fuels and the depletion of forests. The alarming rise in temperatures causes profound global changes in every one of our planet’s natural systems. Each human action has a carbon footprint…and tourism has a big one. By some accounts, it creates nearly 1/10 of annual greenhouse gas emissions. 

So what can we do?

Climate change

Climate change causes melting glaciers, rising sea levels, ocean acidification

Rise in CO2

Dramatic rise in C02 over the past 50 years

High GHG emissions

Tourism is responsible for approximately 8% of the world's annual GHG emissions

The Defining Issue of Our Time

The U.N. calls climate change “the defining issue of our time.” Atmospheric greenhouse gases are at their highest level in history, largely due to the burning of fossil fuels and the depletion of forests. The alarming rise in temperatures causes profound global changes in every one of our planet’s natural systems. Each human action has a carbon footprint…and tourism has a big one. By some accounts, it creates nearly 1/10 of annual greenhouse gas emissions. 

So what can we do?

Forests: Our Best Defence

As the world races to solve our climate crisis, there’s a lot of focus on developing high-tech solutions, but they may be a long way off. Today, forests are the only proven means of sequestering CO2 from the atmosphere on a meaningful scale. During photosynthesis, trees remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, binding it and storing it in their roots, trunks, and branches. They also remove other contaminants, and release oxygen back into the air, which is why they’re called “the earth’s lungs.”

The Icelandic Carbon Fund

The Kolviður Fund is dedicated to carbon offsetting through this “natural technology.” It was founded by two of the oldest, most respected environmental associations in Iceland, the Icelandic Forestry Association and the Icelandic Environment Association. Its mission is multifaceted, aiming to increase carbon sequestration in forest systems to reduce the concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere, to bind the soil and reduce soil erosion, to increase public awareness about greenhouse gas emissions, and to promote education on related issues. 

Iceland Advice is proud to partner with Kolviður in this initiative.

How Does it Work?

By booking through us, you’ll be able to offset the carbon footprint of your tour. 

For each tour, we’ll plant one tree in the special protected Kolviður forests. There is no extra charge for this—you’ll pay exactly the same low price when you book through Iceland Advice as if you booked your tour with another company. 

We plant a variety of species: birches, lodgepole pines, poplars, larches, and spruces. The Kolviður forests are strategically designed for maximum carbon sequestration, protected for 60 years minimum, and open for the public to enjoy.

Iceland's Natural Features

Iceland's Glaciers

Iceland’s is home to Europe’s largest glacier (Vatnajökull), and over 250 named glaciers of all sizes. In all, they cover about 11% of our land. They hold huge appeal for tourists, and are the highlight of many visitors’ time here. But as you may have guessed, glaciers are far from immune to the threats of climate change.  

Iceland’s glaciers have been shrinking rapidly since the mid-1990s. Several glaciers have even “died,” most notably Okjökull in 2014. People usually associate melting ice with sea level rise, but in Iceland the disappearing glaciers can actually have the opposite effect. As the ice becomes lighter, the land begins to rise, which means a shallower sea at the coastline. It also causes an increase in volcanic activity and more eruptions. 

Iceland's Forests

Did you know Iceland suffered one of the worst cases of deforestation on the planet?  

Although our country is known for its barren, windswept landscapes, it wasn’t always that way. Forests used to cover about 40% of our land, until the Vikings arrived and began clearing trees. They destroyed almost all of the forests in just a few hundred years, and in the early 20th century, it’s estimated that only 0.5% of Iceland was forested. We’ve made some progress (we’re at about 2% now) but we struggle to this day with the effects of this destruction, like major soil erosion and fierce sandstorms. 

In the future, visitors will probably experience a much greener Iceland…the goal is to reach 12% forest cover by 2100. In the meantime, our National Forest in East Iceland, Hallormsstaðaskógur, is the largest forest at 740 hectares and is a great place to see native birch trees!

Tourism in Iceland

Iceland wasn’t always such a popular tourist destination. In fact, it was barely on the radar a little over a decade ago…but things have changed quite a bit since then! While this wave of visitors has mostly been a blessing, a 2018 report by the Minister of Tourism, Industry and Innovation confirmed that over-tourism has become an issue, especially at popular attractions. In some areas, the environmental damage has been so severe that the government has been forced to restrict access so the landscapes can regenerate.  

If we can increase awareness about the importance of protecting Iceland’s fragile natural features, visitors can be more mindful and responsible during their travels. 

Tree-Plant

Ready to Travel With Us?

If we work together and make sustainable choices, visitors from around the world can continue to experience the magic of Iceland while helping to make a dent in the climate crisis. 

Join us in our exciting “Book One, Plant One” project. If we all pitch in, we have a fighting chance!